AboutSam D. Say

Sam D. Say is owner and CEO of SSCOR, Inc., a medical device manufacturer specializing in emergency battery operated portable suction devices for the hospital and pre-hospital settings. Mr. Say has been involved in developing product for healthcare providers for over 35 years. His passions include contributing to the management of the patient airway and providing solutions that save lives in difficult conditions.

Checking the Status of Your Portable Suction Unit

Posted by Sam D. Say

Nov 8, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Medical professionals must be sure that all lifesaving equipment is operational when needed, with protocols that dictate equipment inspections and checks. Some checks must be done at the beginning of each shift, and some are scheduled on a less frequent basis. No matter when these equipment checks are done, your patients and your agency are counting on you to make sure that your equipment is functional at the critical time.

 

What tests are appropriate for portable emergency suction?
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The Types of Pneumonia — and Where Suctioning Comes In

Posted by Sam D. Say

Nov 5, 2021 5:45:00 AM

 

Among non-medical professionals, when someone is diagnosed with pneumonia, it’s generally just that — pneumonia is pneumonia. But that’s just a broad label for a life-threatening infection of the lungs. There are multiple causes for the disease, and by some measures, as many as 30 types of pneumonia, although they fall under larger groups.

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Topics: Suction for EMS professionals

Airway Anatomy and Endotracheal Intubation: The Basics

Posted by Sam D. Say

Nov 3, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Endotracheal intubation offers life-saving relief when an airway obstruction endangers a patient’s life. Yet many first responders have little experience with endotracheal intubation. Some even actively avoid training opportunities because they feel overwhelmed and intimidated by the process. Endotracheal intubation is a basic skill that every first responder must master. 

While it does pose some risks, it is also safe with the proper technique and diligent attention to the patient. A keen understanding of airway anatomy can make the process of intubating a patient much easier.

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Topics: Airway management

Can You Really Clear an Airway with a Ballpoint Pen Like in the Movies?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Nov 1, 2021 8:00:00 AM

It’s a dramatic plot twist in movies, medical dramas, and even the occasional sitcom: A character is choking or in respiratory distress and standard interventions like the Heimlich maneuver just aren’t cutting it. So a heroic bystander takes things into their own hands and jams a pen into the victim’s throat, much to everyone’s horror. But then, to everyone’s shock and relief, doing so clears the airway, allowing the survivor to breathe until help arrives. But can you really do this?

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Topics: Airway management, airway obstruction

Dangerous Chest Tube Complications to Avoid During Transport

Posted by Sam D. Say

Oct 27, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Although the placement of chest tubes usually falls to physicians, many healthcare workers—be they paramedics or nurses—have had to care for patients with chest tubes in place, either in a hospital setting or during transport. Chest tubes are a critical factor in certain respiratory emergencies, so let’s review the indications for placement and some of the dangerous complications you can avoid when caring for such patients.

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Topics: Suction for EMS professionals

What Every EMT Should Already Know About Basic Airway Management

Posted by Sam D. Say

Oct 25, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Your BLS engine company is dispatched to a “difficulty breathing” call and your ALS rescue is still in the process of delivering their previous patient to the hospital. Dispatch is sending the next closest rescue, but the responding unit has just notified you that they are held up by a train.


You arrive on scene, grab your O2 bag and jump kit and head inside. You and your fellow EMTs are on your own, at least for the next several minutes. You had better be prepared to assess and initiate treatment for a patient in respiratory distress!

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Topics: Suction for EMS professionals, EMS suction

4 Signs a Patient on a Mechanical Ventilator Requires Suctioning

Posted by Sam D. Say

Oct 20, 2021 8:00:00 AM

After a successful intubation, your patient is mechanically ventilated with a patent airway and his vital signs stabilize. Then, while transporting your patient, you notice a sawtooth pattern to the ventilator waveform. The patient’s cough is not “junky” and his oxygen saturation remains stable.

You may be thinking your patient needs some sedation to help him synchronize with the ventilator. But hold on—perhaps you are missing something.

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Topics: Medical Suction

Suction Device Maintenance for Today and Tomorrow

Posted by Sam D. Say

Oct 18, 2021 5:15:00 AM

 

At SSCOR, we pride ourselves on providing suction that lasts — both in our devices’ consistent performance during each use and the machines’ long lifecycles. 

 

Each of those characteristics are enhanced with routine maintenance, of course. Emergency medical personnel are well aware their equipment must remain as close to new condition as possible — and, not to mention, sanitized.

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Topics: Handheld portable suction

6 Strategies to Help Prevent Aspiration Pneumonia in Adults

Posted by Sam D. Say

Oct 15, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Every good nurse knows that the job involves much more than simply treating the patient’s current illness or injury. Instead, nurses should try to anticipate potential complications that could arise for their patients and implement measures to prevent them from happening.

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Topics: Medical Suction

The Role of In-Situ Simulation in Ongoing Resuscitation Training

Posted by Sam D. Say

Oct 13, 2021 8:00:00 AM

CPR, ACLS, NRP, PAL. As a nurse, you are likely familiar with some, if not all, of these acronyms. Early in your career, you were taught the skills to resuscitate a patient in cardiac or respiratory arrest. Every few years, you attend a class to review and renew your certification.

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Topics: Portable suction for hospitals