AboutSam D. Say

Sam D. Say is owner and CEO of SSCOR, Inc., a medical device manufacturer specializing in emergency battery operated portable suction devices for the hospital and pre-hospital settings. Mr. Say has been involved in developing product for healthcare providers for over 35 years. His passions include contributing to the management of the patient airway and providing solutions that save lives in difficult conditions.

How to Reduce the Risk of Aspiration Pneumonia

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 27, 2020 8:00:00 AM

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Topics: aspiration pneumonia

Emergency Preparedness: COVID-19

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 22, 2020 8:00:00 AM

COVID-19, the novel coronavirus with apparent origins in Wuhan, China, has overtaken the world of emergency medicine. It’s so new that doctors can’t confidently assert much about it, except that it is highly contagious and potentially lethal. Its specific lethality, however, remains hotly contested—and difficult to prove, given low testing rates and the relatively high prevalence of asymptomatic carriers. You probably already know the basics. Here are five things you must understand to protect yourself and the people you serve. 

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness

5 Things to Know About Suctioning Newborns

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 20, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Routine suctioning at birth has been the standard of care for newborns for decades. But recent evidence calls this practice into question, and many hospitals are moving away from it. But this doesn’t mean that suctioning is obsolete. Newborns in respiratory distress, those with low Apgar scores, and those struggling with the transition from fetus to newborn may still need bulb suctioning, or occasionally, suctioning with a machine. Here are five things you need to know about suctioning newborns. 

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Topics: Pediatric Suction

What Care Is Needed After Intubation?

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 5, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Intubation forms a cornerstone of advanced airway management, giving patients oxygen in emergency situations and the surgical suite, in addition to providing long-term breathing support for critically ill patients. Patients will need both immediate and longer-term support following intubation, regardless of the reason for the procedure. Monitoring patients during intubation and providing appropriate follow-up care and support can improve outcomes as well as quality of life. 

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Topics: Intubation

Why Is Airway Management Important During CPR?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 30, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Drug overdoses, sudden injuries, respiratory issues, and myriad other health concerns can trigger cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death, but many of these deaths are preventable. Every year, more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of hospitals. Nearly half of cardiac arrest victims survive when bystanders administer CPR. The figure is even higher when trained first responders are prepared to perform CPR while managing the airway. Airway management is key to successful CPR, and first responders must have the right equipment ready to go. 

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Topics: Airway management

Common Sites of Injury from Blunt Chest Trauma

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 28, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Car accidents are the leading cause of blunt chest trauma. More than 6 million car accidents occur each year in the United States, injuring at least 3 million drivers. Violence is also a common culprit, especially when guns are involved. First responders will inevitably encounter many forms of chest trauma. A comprehensive patient assessment can help you prioritize treatment goals and stabilize patients for transport. However, knowing the most common injuries associated with blunt chest trauma can expedite the assessment and improve treatment outcomes. 

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Topics: Trauma

The Do’s and Don’ts of the Sellick Maneuver

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 16, 2020 8:00:00 AM

 

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Topics: Intubation

Methods for Opening an Obstructed Airway

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 14, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Airway obstructions are a common emergency, especially among pediatric and geriatric patients. Choking is a leading cause of childhood death and injury among children under the age of 4, claiming at least one child’s life every few days. The risk of airway obstructions due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, and airway injuries greatly increases with age. The airway also becomes more fragile as a person gets older, making it more difficult to treat airway issues. A number of techniques can open an obstructed airway, but the right technique depends on the reason for the obstruction. 

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Topics: airway obstruction

Predictors of Difficult Bag Mask Ventilation

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 9, 2020 8:00:00 AM

As a foundational tool in the basic airway management toolkit, bag mask ventilation can save lives, relieve patient stress, and make transport easier. Bag mask ventilation is appropriate when a patient shows signs of hypoxic respiratory failure, apnea, or hypoxically induced altered mental states. Patients who are hyperventilating or have sustained injuries that reduce respiratory effort may also require ventilation. It may be appropriate to ventilate women in labor when there is reason to believe that they are not getting adequate oxygen or are so fatigued that breathing becomes difficult. 

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Topics: Medical Suction

Wound Management in Emergency Medicine: What You Need to Know

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 7, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Even minor wounds can be distressing, especially in patients with bleeding disorders or communicable diseases. Major wounds can be life-threatening, necessitating a prompt response that anticipates complications such as bradycardia and shock. Wound management is a cornerstone of good emergency medicine, and so careful planning and frequent preparation should be part of every team’s continuing education. 

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Topics: EMS Professionals