AboutSam D. Say

Sam D. Say is owner and CEO of SSCOR, Inc., a medical device manufacturer specializing in emergency battery operated portable suction devices for the hospital and pre-hospital settings. Mr. Say has been involved in developing product for healthcare providers for over 35 years. His passions include contributing to the management of the patient airway and providing solutions that save lives in difficult conditions.

Heat Stroke Treatment & Management

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 27, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Extreme heat is the leading cause of natural disaster-related deaths and injuries in the United States. Between 1999-2010, more than 8,000 Americans died of heat-related injuries, and thousands more visited emergency rooms. As summer temperatures soar to record highs, first responders must be prepared to respond to heat stroke and similar symptoms.

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Topics: Emergency medical suction

How to Suction a Patient that is in Cardiac Arrest

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 25, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Cardiac arrest is a nightmare scenario for most first responders. Recent research suggests survival rates are as low as 6 percent when cardiac arrest occurs outside the hospital. Rapid administration of CPR drives survival rates up to 45 percent, and the presence of a first responder elevates the survival rate even higher. But suctioning a patient in cardiac arrest can be challenging. Here’s what you need to know about the procedure.

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Topics: Medical Suction

Intubation and Ventilation of the Asthmatic Patient: What You Need to Know

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 20, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Asthma is a common affliction, affecting 8-10 percent of the population. Many childhood asthmatics grow out of the disorder in adulthood, so a disproportionate percentage of people with asthma are children. For most people, asthma is a minor inconvenience, akin to—and often associated with—seasonal allergies. An unlucky fraction of asthmatics, however, have a more severe form of the illness. About 11,000 people die of asthma each year, and the rate of asthma deaths has increased 50 percent since 1980. Most asthma deaths are preventable with prompt, competent emergency care. Here’s what you need to know about intubation and ventilation of asthma patients.

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Topics: Intubation

What You Need to Know About the SALAD Technique

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 18, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Every year, more than 60,000 Americans die from complications of dysphagia and other swallowing disorders. The most common of these complications is aspiration pneumonia. Traumatic injuries that cause continuous bleeding into the airway can also lead to aspiration. Even with treatment, aspiration has a high mortality rate because it introduces contaminants into the airway. Mortality estimates vary depending on the population studied, but are at least 20-30 percent higher in the elderly and those with preexisting respiratory disorders.

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Quick Overview of Pediatric Intubation

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 13, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Pediatric intubation is the nightmare scenario for every parent. Yet the procedure remains common, thanks in part to differences in children’s airway anatomy that make them more vulnerable to respiratory distress. Your agency must offer regular training on pediatric intubation because the pediatric airway is smaller, more difficult to access, and more vulnerable to injury. Knowledge is no substitute for lived experience, so take every opportunity to practice pediatric intubation. Here’s a quick overview of the process.

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Topics: Pediatric Suction

5 Techniques for Treating a Difficult Airway

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 11, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Sooner or later, every first responder encounters a difficult airway. Training for these scenarios is critical for improving patient care and reducing first responder frustration and burnout. There’s no substitute for lived experience, critical feedback from experienced providers, and drills that mimic real-world situations. However, keeping in mind these five tips can help you more effectively treat difficult airways.

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Topics: Airway management

How to Clear the Airway During a Power Outage

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 6, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Power outages are among the most common emergencies, affecting nearly 40 million people each year. For most people, a power outage is a minor inconvenience that means limited access to screens and perhaps a few hours spent playing board games. For some, power outages are more dangerous, and can mean no access to heat or air conditioning in dangerous temperatures. And for an unlucky few, a power outage can present a life-threatening emergency. Clearing the airway during a power outage is a critical and life-saving skill that all EMS professionals must master.

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness

Airway Management for the Opioid Overdose

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 4, 2019 8:00:00 AM

The opioid overdose epidemic is hitting cities and towns across the nation, with a death toll that is both shocking and rapidly growing. Sixty-eight percent of drug overdose deaths involve an opioid, and opioid overdoses claim an average of 130 American lives each day. Promptly responding to suspected or confirmed opioid overdoses can help slow the epidemic. Airway management is critical for acute care following an overdose. Here’s what you need to know.

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Topics: Airway management

Guidelines for Management of Anaphylaxis

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 30, 2019 8:00:00 AM

As many as 5 percent of Americans have experienced anaphylaxis. Many more may be at risk. An epidemic of allergies means that more and more EMS agencies are routinely dealing with anaphylaxis. Appropriate management can be life-saving, and has already reduced anaphylaxis mortality to less than 1 percent. Brush up on your anaphylaxis management skills with these tips.

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Topics: Anaphylaxis

Why Is Emergency Preparedness Important?

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 28, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Emergency preparedness is a critical aspect of the job for every medical professional, especially first responders. You’ll be working with people at some of the most difficult times of their lives, often in the wake of immense tragedy or a sudden disaster. Emergency preparedness should guide your work. Making sure you’re prepared for emergencies is not something you do once; it’s an ongoing undertaking that you must continually revisit in training, in your work with other agencies, and on your own. Preparedness saves lives.

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness