AboutSam D. Say

Sam D. Say is owner and CEO of SSCOR, Inc., a medical device manufacturer specializing in emergency battery operated portable suction devices for the hospital and pre-hospital settings. Mr. Say has been involved in developing product for healthcare providers for over 35 years. His passions include contributing to the management of the patient airway and providing solutions that save lives in difficult conditions.

What Is the Algorithm for Airway Management?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 30, 2020 12:00:29 PM


Every patient is unique. Expert airway management demands a critical, creative, adaptive approach. Nevertheless, first responders should follow established protocols and guidelines if they want to get the best results. A simple algorithm can help guide decision-making in airway management, while still allowing room for flexible problem-solving. Follow these guidelines to speed treatment and reduce errors in the event of a difficult airway:

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Topics: Airway management

4 Keys to Preventing Lung Infections via Airway Suction

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 23, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Airway suctioning can save lives, support recovery from chronic illnesses, and improve outcomes in ICU patients. Proper airway suctioning is key to preventing infections in patients who cannot clear their own airway, as well as in those who are experiencing certain medical emergencies. But reckless approaches to suctioning and inadequate infection prevention protocols can introduce new dangers, putting vulnerable patients in greater peril. Here’s what you need to know about preventing lung infections via airway suction. 

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Topics: Airway management

5 Things to Know About Suction Canister Management

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 18, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Whether you’re performing routine suctioning during surgical procedures, suctioning a patient on a ventilator, or performing life-saving procedures to prevent or reduce aspiration, diligent suction canister management is critical to proper patient care. Particularly as concerns about a global flu or coronavirus pandemic mount, your agency must work proactively to reduce the risk of transmitting contagious diseases via equipment such as suction machines. Here are five things you need to know about suction canister management. 

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Topics: Medical Suction

CDC VAP Guidelines 2020

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 16, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) accounts for 60 percent of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) deaths. According to 2015 research from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), VAP accounts for 32 percent of all healthcare-related pneumonia cases. People on ventilators are often medically fragile, battling serious respiratory illnesses or chronic medical conditions. So the death rate for this form of pneumonia is extraordinarily high—between 20 and 33 percent, according to most estimates. Healthcare providers can take a number of proactive steps to protect their patients from this potentially lethal infection. 

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Topics: CDC

How to Hyperoxygenate Before Suctioning

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 11, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Hypoxia is one of the most common suctioning complications. It’s also preventable in most scenarios. Hyperoxygenating a patient prior to suctioning can reduce the risk of hypoxia, as well as other suctioning complications. Here’s what you need to know about the process. 

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Topics: Medical Suction

CDC Infection Control Guidelines 2020

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 9, 2020 8:00:00 AM

A terrible flu season, the looming specter of a coronavirus outbreak, and the daily realities of localized infections all highlight the need for rigorous infection control. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issues annual infection control guidelines to reduce the risk of spreading potentially dangerous or even lethal illnesses. Many of these guidelines are common sense, and echo the things you learned in childhood about washing your hands and covering your cough. A friendly reminder of these guidelines may encourage you and your team to redouble your infection prevention strategies, especially because doing so requires little additional effort. 

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Topics: CDC

What You Need to Know About Nasal Suctioning a Patient

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 4, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Sooner or later, almost every medical provider sees a patient who needs nasal suctioning. This mainstay of emergency medicine saves lives, shortens hospital stays, and reduces medical complications. If you work in EMS, you may suction patients daily. For other providers, suctioning is a rarity. No matter where you work, a basic familiarity with the procedures for nasal suctioning is critical to quality patient care. 

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Topics: Medical Suction

4 Things to Know About Deep Suctioning for RSV in Infants

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 2, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Almost all children become infected with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by the age of 2. For neonates and immunocompromised babies, however, this can be a life-threatening disease. The unique airways of very young babies can compromise their ability to clear airway secretions, increasing the risk of serious complications. Deep suctioning can reduce their discomfort—and in some cases—even save their lives. Here’s what you need to know. 

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Topics: Pediatric Suction

How to Reduce the Risk of Aspiration Pneumonia

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 27, 2020 8:00:00 AM

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Topics: aspiration pneumonia

Emergency Preparedness: COVID-19

Posted by Sam D. Say

May 22, 2020 8:00:00 AM

COVID-19, the novel coronavirus with apparent origins in Wuhan, China, has overtaken the world of emergency medicine. It’s so new that doctors can’t confidently assert much about it, except that it is highly contagious and potentially lethal. Its specific lethality, however, remains hotly contested—and difficult to prove, given low testing rates and the relatively high prevalence of asymptomatic carriers. You probably already know the basics. Here are five things you must understand to protect yourself and the people you serve. 

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness