AboutSam D. Say

Sam D. Say is owner and CEO of SSCOR, Inc., a medical device manufacturer specializing in emergency battery operated portable suction devices for the hospital and pre-hospital settings. Mr. Say has been involved in developing product for healthcare providers for over 35 years. His passions include contributing to the management of the patient airway and providing solutions that save lives in difficult conditions.

The Best Dental Suction Techniques to Use in Oral Surgery

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 31, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Fear of visiting the dentist and undergoing oral surgery can make patients reluctant to seek dental care and increase their discomfort when they do. Many Americans suffer from some form of dental anxiety. Oral surgery to treat cavities, infections, broken teeth, and jaw and gingival health issues are among the most common medical procedures. 

Read More

Topics: Medical Suction for Dental

The Role of Capnography in Medical Suction

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 24, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Medical providers have long used pulse oximeters as a quick and easy way to assess blood oxygen levels. But the amount of CO2 a person expires is an equally useful piece of information that provides key details about ventilation. Capnography is now widely available in the field and provides clear data about the amount of CO2 expired at each stage of respiration. Using capnography during medical suction can reduce the risk of hypoxia and provide additional details about patients at risk of serious suction-related complications

Read More

Topics: Medical Suction

The Link Between Suctioning and Blood Pressure

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 17, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Read More

Topics: Medical Suction

What Are the Most Common Causes of Upper Airway Obstruction?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 11, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Airway obstructions are common and may even be underreported. The prevalence and type of airway obstruction varies with age. Children younger than 4, for example, are more vulnerable to choking-related upper airway obstructions, and adults commonly experience airway obstruction caused by complications from smoking. First responders will inevitably encounter a wide variety of airway obstructions and must be prepared to promptly respond to each with appropriate medical care. Here are the most common causes of upper airway obstruction. 

Read More

Topics: Airway management, airway obstruction

5 Common Airway Issues in the SCI Patient

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 9, 2019 8:00:00 AM

More than 17,000 people suffer spinal cord injuries each year, and an estimated 249,000-363,000 Americans are living with spinal cord injuries. A few generations ago, a spinal cord injury was often a death sentence, and almost always meant a much shorter life. Thanks to better medical care and greater awareness, most spinal cord injury sufferers survive, and many go on to live long and healthy lives. Despite these improvements, respiratory issues are common in SCI survivors. Pneumonia is a leading cause of death in this group, often due to complications of respiratory infections and poorly managed airway obstructions. First responders and other providers must be prepared to rapidly respond to airway issues in SCI patients, whether treating the immediate aftermath of a spinal cord injury or providing care to long-term SCI survivors. 

Read More

Topics: Medical Suction

6 Suction Catheter Uses

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 2, 2019 8:00:00 AM

A suction catheter is one of the most versatile, useful pieces of medical equipment in your supply bag. Whether it’s preventing emergencies before they start or offering life-saving treatment when a person cannot effectively breathe on their own, the right suction catheter is critical to doing your job. Here are 6 key suction catheter uses. 

Read More

Topics: Suction Catheter

Heat Stroke Treatment & Management

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 27, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Extreme heat is the leading cause of natural disaster-related deaths and injuries in the United States. Between 1999-2010, more than 8,000 Americans died of heat-related injuries, and thousands more visited emergency rooms. As summer temperatures soar to record highs, first responders must be prepared to respond to heat stroke and similar symptoms.

Read More

Topics: Emergency medical suction

How to Suction a Patient that is in Cardiac Arrest

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 25, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Cardiac arrest is a nightmare scenario for most first responders. Recent research suggests survival rates are as low as 6 percent when cardiac arrest occurs outside the hospital. Rapid administration of CPR drives survival rates up to 45 percent, and the presence of a first responder elevates the survival rate even higher. But suctioning a patient in cardiac arrest can be challenging. Here’s what you need to know about the procedure.

Read More

Topics: Medical Suction

Intubation and Ventilation of the Asthmatic Patient: What You Need to Know

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 20, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Asthma is a common affliction, affecting 8-10 percent of the population. Many childhood asthmatics grow out of the disorder in adulthood, so a disproportionate percentage of people with asthma are children. For most people, asthma is a minor inconvenience, akin to—and often associated with—seasonal allergies. An unlucky fraction of asthmatics, however, have a more severe form of the illness. About 11,000 people die of asthma each year, and the rate of asthma deaths has increased 50 percent since 1980. Most asthma deaths are preventable with prompt, competent emergency care. Here’s what you need to know about intubation and ventilation of asthma patients.

Read More

Topics: Intubation

What You Need to Know About the SALAD Technique

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jun 18, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Every year, more than 60,000 Americans die from complications of dysphagia and other swallowing disorders. The most common of these complications is aspiration pneumonia. Traumatic injuries that cause continuous bleeding into the airway can also lead to aspiration. Even with treatment, aspiration has a high mortality rate because it introduces contaminants into the airway. Mortality estimates vary depending on the population studied, but are at least 20-30 percent higher in the elderly and those with preexisting respiratory disorders.

Read More