Challenges All Emergency Responders Should Prepare for in 2022

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 17, 2022 7:00:00 AM

 

Each new year comes with a new set of challenges for EMS teams, but some ongoing issues medical professionals faced in 2021 also serve as strong indicators for what’s to come in 2022. 

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Topics: respiratory assessment

SSCOR's Top Blogs of 2021

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 13, 2022 12:50:04 PM

 

2021 was another unique year for medical professionals, as the pandemic stretched into another year, reminding us how important it is to keep up with changing health and safety information. 

 

That message resonates with SSCOR, because the products we produce often directly impact patient health and well-being. It’s also a big reason we like to keep our customers and friends in the emergency medicine sector informed through our blog.

 

As we look to 2022, these were the most-read blogs from the past year. 

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Topics: respiratory assessment

How to Reduce the Risk of Aspiration Pneumonia

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 10, 2022 8:00:00 AM

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Topics: aspiration pneumonia

Clearing the Airway: Choosing the Right Suction Strategy for the Right Patient

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 7, 2022 8:00:00 AM

Suctioning a patient’s airway is not a “one size fits all” procedure. Whether to clear secretions that the patient cannot mobilize, remove vomitus or foreign materials from the pharynx or trachea, or to maintain the patency of an artificial airway, some suction strategies will work better than others for a particular situation.  

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Topics: Emergency medical suction

New Year’s Resolutions for Your EMS Team in 2022

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 3, 2022 6:30:00 AM

 

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Topics: ambulance safety

Three Critical Components of a Respiratory Assessment Checklist

Posted by Sam D. Say

Dec 31, 2021 8:00:00 AM

We all know the key to a thorough patient assessment is to approach it systematically so that we don’t become distracted (by that bleeding scalp wound) or skip steps that may yield valuable information (like listening to breath sounds). There’s a reason we are all taught “head-to-toe” surveys: so that we work our way through essential assessment points, avoiding a haphazard exam where key signs are missed.

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Topics: Airway management

How to Properly Clean A Portable Suction Device

Posted by Sam D. Say

Dec 27, 2021 8:00:00 AM

 

Ask any emergency responder and they'll tell you the critical role portable suction plays in maintaining airway patency. No other tool can remove blood, vomit, or sputum from the airway, or allow you to visualize the cords prior to intubation.

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Topics: Medical Suction

What You Need to Know About the SALAD Technique

Posted by Sam D. Say

Dec 24, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Every year, more than 60,000 Americans die from complications of dysphagia and other swallowing disorders–the most common of these is aspiration pneumonia. Traumatic injuries that cause continuous bleeding into the airway can also lead to aspiration. Even with treatment, aspiration has a high mortality rate because it introduces contaminants into the airway. Mortality estimates vary depending on the population studied, but are much higher in older, sicker patients.

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The History of the Yankauer Suction Tip and Where Med Tech Is Today

Posted by Sam D. Say

Dec 20, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Medicine is an ever-changing ecosystem. As technology improves, new equipment is created that performs better, is safer, and easier to use. However, some devices withstand the test of time and have been with us for decades and its design will be with us into the future, albeit with some modern touches.

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Topics: Medical Suction

Airway Management After Immobilization for Emergency Responders

Posted by Sam D. Say

Dec 17, 2021 6:00:00 AM

 

You arrive at the scene of the accident, where it was reported a young man was struck by a pickup truck while crossing a busy road. Approaching the scene, it’s clear he has likely suffered significant injuries. The truck’s windshield is cracked, and the patient has facial trauma and splayed limbs. You immediately begin to inventory the situation and start assessing whether the patient needs to receive a spinal immobilization. 

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