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Respiratory Failure vs. Distress

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 11, 2024 8:00:00 AM

Download a great infographic for this blog!

 

Respiratory failure and respiratory distress are both medical emergencies that demand prompt treatment and present special dangers to vulnerable groups such as children, elders, and people with chronic illnesses. Respiratory distress, for example, affects about 1% of newborns and is the leading cause of death in neonates born prematurely.

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Topics: Respiratory, respiratory assessment

5 Things to Know About Suctioning Newborns

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 6, 2024 8:00:00 AM

Routine suctioning at birth has been the standard of care for newborns for decades. However, evidence calls this practice into question, and many hospitals are moving away from it. But this doesn’t mean that suctioning is obsolete. Newborns in respiratory distress, those with low Apgar scores, and those struggling with the transition from fetus to newborn may still need bulb suctioning, or occasionally, suctioning with a machine. Here are five things you need to know about suctioning newborns.

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Topics: Pediatric Suction

4 Types of Natural Disasters and Their Specific Injuries

Posted by Sam D. Say

Apr 4, 2024 8:00:00 AM

Download a great infographic for this blog!

For many, there is nothing more beautiful than watching Mother Nature in action. Witnessing the power of 30-foot waves crashing against the beach or taking a boat down a winding river while it cuts its way through a valley can be an amazing experience. Unfortunately, sometimes that power manifests itself as a natural disaster. The following is an overview of four types of natural disasters and the specific injuries usually encountered by a hospital.

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Topics: Hospital disaster preparation

What Are the Most Common Complications of Suctioning?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Mar 30, 2024 8:00:00 AM

Although many first responders express reservations about airway suctioning, it is a potentially life-saving procedure that when performed correctly has a low risk of complications. With both cold and flu season and allergies causing year-round respiratory issues, it is always a great time for first responders to brush up on their airway management skills. Continuing education classes and regular drills can prepare you to manage even difficult airways. It’s equally important to be mindful of the main complications of suctioning. Awareness of these potential complications can guide your technique while encouraging your team to remain vigilant and diligent.

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Topics: Medical Suction

Respiratory Distress in a Patient with Clear Lungs: What You Need to Know

Posted by Sam D. Say

Mar 28, 2024 8:00:00 AM

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) occurs when blood oxygen levels drop too low because fluid has accumulated in the lungs. Numerous medical conditions, both acute and chronic, can cause ARDS. Often, a first responder or doctor hears wheezing or crackling sounds coming from the lungs. When the lungs are clear, this usually signals a hematologic, metabolic, or obstructive process. Here’s what you need to know about diagnosing and treating the cause.

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Topics: Respiratory

Purchasing Replacement Batteries for Your Portable Suction Device

Posted by Scott Eamer

Mar 23, 2024 8:00:00 AM

The majority of portable suction devices are powered by sealed lead-acid batteries. While this type of battery uses stable and reliable chemistry, it can lose capacity over time and require replacement. When buying a replacement battery for your portable suction device, there are a few things you should keep in mind.

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Topics: Battery-powered suction, Emergency medical suction, Airway management, Medical Suction

Are You Prepared for Pediatric Trauma?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Mar 21, 2024 8:00:00 AM

The call came in as a “child down.” No other information was available. As your unit races to the scene, you do a quick mental inventory of the equipment you may need: pedi bag, airway bag, spinal immobilization, trauma bag. As with any emergency, your pulse is racing, but when the call involves a child, there is always an added layer of stress. Is your equipment ready? Did you inventory the pedi bag this morning? Can you recall the drug dosages, in case the child is in full arrest? A million questions flash through your mind.

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness

This Month in Emergency Preparedness News: The 5 Most Common School Emergencies

Posted by Sam D. Say

Mar 16, 2024 8:00:00 AM

School is in session, and medical emergencies in school are common – 10% to 15% of students have special medical needs or a chronic health issue—yet many schools are unprepared to manage them. 

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness

How Medical Suction Machines Can Improve Patient Outcomes

Posted by Sam D. Say

Mar 14, 2024 8:00:00 AM

Your suction machine is an unassuming but key ingredient in your emergency preparedness kit, allowing you to help patients remain comfortable, reduce their risk of serious airway complications, and – in some cases – save their lives.

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Tracheal Trauma Airway Management

Posted by Sam D. Say

Mar 9, 2024 8:00:00 AM

 

For many first responders, airway trauma is an unusual scenario. Airway trauma accounts for less than 1% of traumatic injuries. Those with little experience managing airway trauma may be reluctant to intervene and lack confidence in their skill. Given the high mortality rates associated with severe airway trauma and the risks involved, first responders must master the art and science of tracheal trauma airway management. Regular drills and continuing education classes can help.

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Topics: Respiratory