Respiratory Distress in Patients with a CPAP: What You Need to Know

Posted by Sam D. Say

Aug 18, 2020 7:00:00 AM

Most patients know only about continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. But in emergency medicine, CPAP has many uses, particularly for neonates with respiratory distress. 

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Topics: Respiratory, respiratory assessment

Respiratory Failure vs. Distress

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jul 21, 2020 7:01:00 AM

Respiratory failure and respiratory distress are both medical emergencies that demand prompt treatment. Both present special dangers to vulnerable groups such as children, elders, and people with chronic illnesses. Respiratory distress, for example, affects about 1 percent of newborns, and is the leading cause of death in neonates born prematurely.

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Topics: Respiratory, respiratory assessment

The Consequences Patient Care Providers Face When They Fail to Use Their Tools

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 23, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Patient care providers—doctors, first responders, nurses, and a veritable cornucopia of other experts—all must rely on a deep toolbox of life-saving equipment. Caring for patients requires that care providers know when, where, and how to use these tools, and that they keep these tools ready to go at all times. This is more than just a professional duty; it’s a moral obligation. Care providers can face serious consequences when they fail to prepare and correctly use their tools. 

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Topics: Respiratory

Does Airway Protection Prevent Acute Respiratory Failure?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Dec 13, 2019 11:51:08 AM

Airway protection can be life-saving for people who are experiencing the effects of both acute and chronic respiratory illness. But airway protection is not an antidote to respiratory failure, and will not necessarily prevent it. Indeed, some doctors even argue that the need for airway protection is a sign of respiratory failure, because the patient cannot effectively exchange gases on their own. Prompt intervention in a respiratory emergency may prevent respiratory failure in some cases, although there are no guarantees. 

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Topics: Respiratory

Respiratory Distress in a Patient with Clear Lung: What You Need to Know

Posted by Sam D. Say

Nov 26, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Acute respiratory distress occurs when blood oxygen levels drop too low because of fluid accumulating in the lungs. Numerous medical conditions, both acute and chronic, can cause ARDS. In many cases, a first responder or doctor will hear wheezing or crackling sounds coming from the lungs. When the lungs are clear, this usually signals a hematologic, metabolic, or obstructive process. Here’s what you need to know about diagnosing and treating the cause. 

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Topics: Respiratory

The Fundamentals of Assessing Respiratory Status

Posted by Sam D. Say

Nov 20, 2019 8:00:00 AM

According to a 2014 study, about 1 in 8 non-traumatic emergency visits were due to respiratory distress. Among patients with respiratory health issues or an emergent trauma, the figure may have been even higher. Assessing respiratory status is a core component of emergency and trauma care, as well as medical intake. Even when respiratory distress is not the presenting issue, it may be a complicating factor. 

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Topics: Respiratory

What You Need to Know About Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies

Posted by Sam D. Say

Feb 28, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Pediatric respiratory emergencies may make even the most seasoned provider nervous. It’s safe to say that when a child is hurt or sick, the situation becomes more serious. Your pediatric patient is not simply a smaller version of your adult patient. Children require special considerations, especially when a child is experiencing a respiratory emergency. There are a few things to keep in mind about pediatric respiratory emergencies: variations in pediatric airway anatomy, common respiratory emergencies in children, assessment techniques, and equipment choice. Let’s review how all of these factors relate to pediatric respiratory emergencies and how you can be better prepared when facing such an emergency.

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Topics: Respiratory

What Are the Signs of Respiratory Distress in Newborns?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 22, 2019 8:00:00 AM

For adults and children, respiratory diseases are typically just a minor annoyance. For neonates, they can be fatal. Respiratory distress is a leading cause of death in newborns, particularly premature infants. In addition to infectious causes, it can also occur in the moments following birth. About 7 percent of neonates experience respiratory distress shortly after being born.

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Topics: Respiratory

Tracheal Trauma Airway Management

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 10, 2019 8:00:00 AM

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Topics: Respiratory

What Are The Signs Of Respiratory Distress in Children?

Posted by Sam D. Say

Jan 8, 2019 8:00:00 AM

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Topics: Respiratory